Photo courtesy of Bethany Christian Schools

Adam Krahn, a senior at Bethany Christian Schools in Goshen, Ind., earned grand prize for his essay on global hunger in the MCC U.S. Washington Office annual essay contest.

WASHINGTON – Adam Krahn, a senior at Bethany Christian Schools in Goshen, Ind., has earned grand prize for his essay on global hunger in the Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) U.S. Washington Office annual essay contest.

In his essay entitled “Effectively easing global hunger,” Krahn analyzed the administration and effectiveness of U.S. international food aid. Krahn also described the role of nongovernmental organizations in eliminating global hunger and called for increased support of economic development and peacebuilding abroad.

Referring to the difficulty in reforming food aid in ways that benefit local economies rather than U.S. corporations, Krahn wrote, “As a nation, it seems our allegiance to capitalism trumped our better judgment. … U.S. food aid does help a large number of people avoid starvation. … But a supplementary program should be created to cover its shortfalls. … More specifically, the program would use funds raised in the U.S. to not only feed the hungry, but strengthen local economies and promote agricultural growth through local food purchases and education programs for farmers.”

Krahn’s home congregation is Yellow Creek Mennonite Church, Goshen.

In addition to the grand prize, national honorable mention prizes were awarded to Gabriel Eisenbeis of Freeman (S.D.) Academy, and Katie Hurst and Kinza Yoder, both of Bethany Christian Schools. Eisenbeis examined the topic of global hunger, Hurst focused on creating justice for the people of Haiti and Yoder wrote about addressing mass incarceration in the U.S. through the lens of restorative justice.

The essay contest highlights the perspectives of youth on significant public policy issues and promotes the involvement of young people in faithful witness to government authorities.

The annual contest is open to Anabaptist youth of high school age and to all youth who attend Mennonite high schools. Entries are judged on the participants’ understanding of the issues, clarity of argument and degree of creativity in crafting thoughtful policy positions. Grand prize is $300, and honorable mention winners each receive $100.

Excerpts from the winning essays can be found at washingtonmemo.org.